Sue Ware

Sue Ware

Sue ware traces its roots to the high-fired stoneware of the Korean peninsula, and the Korean influence is strong in early Sue ware forms. The appearance of Sue ware marks the first major technological advance in the history of Japanese ceramics. Innovations included...
Haji Ware

Haji Ware

Following Yayoi earthenware came Haji ware of the Kofun period. The name Hajiki (Haji ware) actually comes from written records such as Wamyoruijusho and Engishiki of the Heian period, but the name is a general term for primitive unglazed earthenware made in the Kofun...
Yayoi Earthenware

Yayoi Earthenware

Yayoi earthenware followed Jomon earthenware, and it is thought to have been first made in around northern Kyushu in the third century B.C. The name ‚Yayoi” comes from a shell mound discovered in 1884 in Mukogaoka, Yayoi-cho, Hongo, Tokyo. One of the reasons for...
Jomon Earthenware

Jomon Earthenware

The history of Japanese ceramics begins with Jomon earthenware, said to be the world’s oldest earthenware. The name „Jomon” is based on the term „cord-marked pottery” which was used by E.S. Morse, known for the excavation of the Omori Kaizuka...